Against my better judgment I gave a fist time broody hen a clutch to sit on mid January. The summer had been very mild and a clutch of 8 had just hatched. Since the hen was very determined and so few hens go broody nowadays I thought it worth the risk.
All was going well until the tree shading the pens fell down and the heatwave set in. Up to then I gave the hen a light spray with water every second morning. I built some shades, turned on the misters for periods through the hottest part of the day and in the late afternoon when the sun hit the shed put a sprinkler on there.
I really did not expect any chicks. But after the usual 21 days, 4 chicks where spotted and where quickly out and moving around. A 50% hatching rate. They are busy eating, drinking and learning how to scratch so all is well for their future.


  1. Hi Deb
    I was pleased to read that you managed to hatch these four chicks. How many turned out to be roosters? I understand 4 in every 7 are normally male, and this seems about right from our experience.
    I find a broody hen does a good job of protecting the chicks once they hatch, and introduing them to the flock, finding nutritious food for them, and generally taking care of them in a marvellous manner.
    Sadly, we lose a few too, often after a few months of feeding them, so returns can be low.
    I especially like your new chook-house shades.
    Cheers and well done

  2. Always the best way to go if you can letting nature take it's course.Had some late goslings last year due to the funny seasons and all was well.But then geese are so tough.